Historic Hubbard House Gets Its Landmark Designation

January 15, 2009 at 10:55 pm 1 comment

The Hubbard House, a Rare Dutch-American Farmhouse in Gravesend, Brooklyn, was designated an individual landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) on Tuesday.

It was one of five designations to receive the unanimous approval of the LPC. The others Include 275 Madison Ave., an Art Deco-style skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan; the Elsworth House, an oysterman’s Italianate-style residence on Staten Island; and the New York Public Library’s Georgian Revival-style George Bruce Branch and Italian Renaissance Palazzo-style 125th Street Branch, both in Harlem.

They bring the total number of individual buildings with landmark status in all five boroughs to 1,222. “This group of designations reflects the rich variety of architectural and historical layers that give New York City its distinctive texture,” said Commission Chairman Robert B. Tierney. “Each property is designed in a unique style and illustrates a telling moment in the city’s development over the span of nearly two centuries.”

Description of Hubbard House

“The house retains an exceptional amount of original fabric,” Tierney said. Following is the LPC description:

“Built around 1830-1835, the 1.5-story home is one of the few Dutch houses in New York City remaining on its original site. It was built for Nelly Hubbard, the daughter of a farmer of Dutch descent who married a descendant of one of the first English patentees in Gravesend. Its construction is attributed Lawrence Ryder, a Gravesend carpenter-builder.

“The small, simple residence still has its original curving eaves, gabled roof, window frames and wide-pine clapboard siding. It was built with traditional Dutch framing known as ‘H-bent construction.’ “The house was leased to workers and artisans in the last half of the 19th century. It was purchased in 1904 by an Italian garment worker named Vincenzo Lucchelli, who added a two-story, hipped-roof wing to the building in 1924. The residence remained in his family until the late 1990s, when it was acquired by its present owner, John Antonides.”

Proposed Fillmore Place Historic District Includes Childhood Home of Henry Miller

The LPC also voted to calendar the proposed Fillmore Place Historic District in Williamsburg for a public hearing at a later date.

Fillmore Place District is described by the Municipal Art Society, which has been active in its preservation, as a charming district, just one block in length, bounded by Driggs Avenue to the west and Roebling Street to the east.

It is made up of approximately 20 pre-Civil War buildings, primarily three-story brick row houses designed for multi-family use.

The largely intact blocks were planned and developed in the mid-19th century, in the midst of the area’s first real estate boom, for the middle and working class families who settled close to the shipyards and docks of the industrial waterfront.

The proposed district also includes the childhood home of the writer Henry Miller, who lived at 662 Driggs Ave. until 1901.

Compiled by Linda Collins

The Brooklyn Eagle

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1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Coastal home | Beach Homes  |  January 16, 2009 at 12:44 am

    […] Historic Hubbard House Gets Its Landmark Designation « Going Coastal“Built around 1830-1835, the 1.5-story home is one of the few Dutch houses in New York City remaining on its original site. It was built for Nelly Hubbard, the daughter of a farmer of Dutch descent who married a descendant of one of the …  read more… […]

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